Tech companies shut down white nationalist sites

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August 19, 2017 at 5:06 PM EDT

225058225059225059Tech companies shut down white nationalist sitesEvents in Charlottesville last week prompted the tech community to take steps against hate speech. Companies like Google have stopped hosting white nationalist websites, and Facebook and Twitter have shut down known white nationalists’ accounts. Cindy Cohn of the Electronic Frontier Foundation warns that the tactics used to silence neo-Nazis online could be used against others in the future.2017-08-19 03:52 pmdisabled3003901429NqJzpLsnXtI225054225050http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/women-joining-alt-right/Why are women joining the ‘alt-right’?After the violent “Unite the Right” white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, last Saturday, the “alt-right” has come under renewed scrutiny. Its ideology rejects Jewish people, people of color, LGBTQ people and immigrants, and is dominated by white men — so why are some women joining it? Harper’s Magazine’s Seyward Darby, who reported on the issue, joins Hari Sreenivasan.2017-08-19 03:21 pmhttp://d3i6fh83elv35t.cloudfront.net/newshour/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/RTS18LF2-320×196.jpg3003900502DnhnjsJ3zFg224983225004http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/anticipating-protests-boston-hopes-prevent-another-charlottesville/Boston hopes to prevent another CharlottesvilleBoston police and city officials are preparing for a self-titled “free speech” demonstration on Saturday, which comes in the wake of last weekend’s white nationalist and white supremacist protest in Charlottesville, Virginia. John Yang learns more from Philip Martin of WGBH.2017-08-18 06:00 pmhttp://d3i6fh83elv35t.cloudfront.net/newshour/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/RTS1CBZV-320×196.jpg3003895044p_3jATPOlCg224884224866http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/cities-prepare-tensions-confederate-statues/How cities prepare for tensions over Confederate statuesStatues of Confederate leaders have been removed in the night, torn down by protesters and seen as a flash point for communities, especially in the South. What challenges do cities face when trying to deal with controversial memorials, as well as the backlash? Hari Sreenivasan talks with Lt. Ryan Lee of the Portland Police Bureau and Mayor Jim Gray of Lexington, Kentucky.2017-08-17 06:00 pmhttp://d3i6fh83elv35t.cloudfront.net/newshour/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/RTS1BW52-e1502817962305-320×196.jpg3003863276D2O-s_hcOPc

Events in Charlottesville last week prompted the tech community to take steps against hate speech. Companies like Google have stopped hosting white nationalist websites, and Facebook and Twitter have shut down known white nationalists’ accounts. Cindy Cohn of the Electronic Frontier Foundation warns that the tactics used to silence neo-Nazis online could be used against others in the future.

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