As Apple and Facebook Chiefs Visit, Xi Jinping Vows Deeper Reform

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On Monday, Mr. Xi used his remarks to promote his credentials as a leader following Deng’s footsteps as an economic reformer and defender of global trade.

“China is advancing comprehensive deepening of reform with unprecedented determination and vigor,” he said, according to a summary of his comments issued by Xinhua, the official Chinese news agency. He added that “China has and will continue issuing a series of measures to further open up.”

Mr. Xi’s professed his commitment to economic openness and reform nearly 10 days after he opened a Communist Party congress that confirmed him as China’s leader for five more years. The congress also endorsed his vision, laid out in a work report, of a nation firmly in the party’s grip and dedicated to reclaiming a central place on the international stage.

International investors and business groups have grown increasingly skeptical about Mr. Xi’s commitment to opening up the Chinese economy. The Chinese government, citing worries that foreign technology and companies could compromise the country’s security, has fed those doubts by tightening restrictions over the internet and advanced technology.

And even as Mr. Xi reiterated his commitment to reform, he emphasized that China’s sovereignty and security were of paramount importance.

“China will firmly defend its sovereignty, security and developmental interests, and at the same time adhere to a fundamental national policy of opening up,” he said.

In a further move in that direction, the Chinese government on Monday announced new rules meant to restrict online journalism, including a blacklist for erring journalists.

For the executives attending the event on Monday, the restrictions are hitting the bottom line. Facebook remains mostly blocked in China despite the company’s lobbying efforts. Apple said this year that it would build a data center in the country to conform with a new Chinese cybersecurity law.

The moves by Beijing have prompted calls in Washington for added scrutiny of Chinese companies seeking to do business in the United States or buy up American technology companies. Such issues are unlikely to be addressed in the coming meeting between Mr. Trump and Mr. Xi, experts said.

Mr. Xi’s appeal to the executives on Monday in some ways contrasted with Mr. Trump’s clashes with the leaders of some American tech companies. Other executives attending the event included Satya Nadella, Microsoft’s chief executive; Masayoshi Son, the chief executive of SoftBank; Henry M. Paulson Jr., the former Treasury secretary; Jack Ma, the founder of Alibaba; Pony Ma, Tencent’s chief executive; and Terry Guo, the chief executive of Foxconn.

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